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Wamvenga Stories

The Daktari Children Wildlife Club

Posted by Robin on Tue January 5, 2016 in Wamvenga Stories.

The Daktari children wildlife club members, with a group of 10 their members, visited us for a game drive. I found out on arrival that only 2 of the Daktari children wildlife club members had seen a lion in the wild... No one in our car has seen a “live” rhino but me! I am on Game drive in the Greater Makalali Conservancy. My game viewer is filled to the brim, not with foreigners from far-away continents but with teenagers from a local village called; “The Oaks”. They have started the Daktari children wildlife club at their village. The village is just 10 km away from the wildlife reserve and my passengers are all around 15-16 years old. Most of them recently joined their village’s newly founded Daktari children wildlife club and are very excited for this trip.

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Phanuels Golden Rules

Posted by Robin on Tue January 5, 2016 in Wamvenga Stories.

In South Africa the term “spoor” is mainly used to indicate the tracks of an animal or person. Spoor can be simple tracks in the sand of a riverbed but it goes further than that. It can also include flattened grass, scrapings on trees, scattered seeds or maybe broken off branches. Even the smell that an animal left behind belongs to the kingdom of “spoor”. This short tale explains how trailing spoor or tracks can help you increase your leadership awareness and reach your goals in life.

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Lion Leadership

Posted by Robin on Tue January 5, 2016 in Wamvenga Stories.

This is a story about lion leadership. It was at the midst of summer six years ago that I saw the two male lions crouching down in the high Guinea grass (Panicum maximum). They were freshly transported into Makalali from a private game reserve around Kgaligadi National park close to the Botswana border with South Africa. Kgaligadi isan area with vast plains consisting of semi-desert vegetation formed by succulents, rocks and hardy clumpsof grass but few trees to escape the blistering sun.

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Elephant Leadership

Posted by Robin on Tue January 5, 2016 in Wamvenga Stories.

Wildlife often shows astonishing leadership - as well as team working skills. Elephant significance leadership is a great example. All elephant herds are led by a female elephant, the so-called “matriarch”. Her daughter is groomed and trained throughout her live to take over when the matriarch will eventually be too old to lead the herd. At this time the old matriarch will stay behind to calmly lay down and die so not to burden the herd that needs to be on the move almost 24 hours a day.

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